Book Review: Shadowlark

Book Review: ShadowlarkShadowlark by Meagan Spooner
Series: Skylark #2
Published by Carolrhoda Lab on October 1st 2013
Pages: 336
Buy on Amazon
Goodreads

Ever since she escaped the city within the Wall, Lark Ainsley's wanted one thing: to find her brother Basil. She's always believed he would be the one to put an end to the constant fear and flight. And now, hidden underground in the chaotically magical city of Lethe, Lark feels closer to him than ever.

But Lethe is a city cowering in fear of its founder, the mysterious Prometheus, and of his private police force. To get the truth about what happened to Basil, Lark has no choice but to face Prometheus.

Facing her fears has become second nature to Lark. Facing the truth is another matter.

Lark never asked to be anyone's savior. She certainly never wanted to be anyone's weapon. She might not have a choice.

Last year, Skylark took me by storm. In a time where dystopians have begun to feel oversaturated as a topic, Skylark was exactly what I was needing to believe that there are still amazing dystopian tales to be told. Just the right amount of romance. Plenty of creativity and originality. A twist, I never, ever saw coming. Skylark was a read that I was happy to sing praises about.

The same can be almost said for Shadowlark.

Shadowlark was an easy sequel to slip back into. However, I did have a bit of an issue with the beginning since there was very minimal rehashing. So, if it has been a while since you have read Skylark, you may want to brush up on what happened and who some of the characters are, or you may be a little lost like I was.

Picking up right after Skylark, Shadowlark steps off on the right foot with the action starting almost from the get go. Lark and Tansy have left the Iron Wood and are still in search for Lark's brother, Basil. Which has lead them to another city, an underground city. A city of secrets, where danger lurks around the corner. But despite all the dangers, this time she may have found what she was looking for.

The twists and turns that made Skylark so brilliant, this time around was a huge miss from me. Maybe the clues were too obvious. Maybe it all just fell into place too easily. I don't know. But it made me a little sad seeing how everything was setting up for the reveal, when I basically already knew (or at least, highly suspected) how everything was going to turn out way before I even hit the half way mark.

Twists and turns aside. I have to say that I did enjoy Shadowlark… a lot. However, it wasn't for the reasons that I thought I would. The growth of our main character was nice. I liked seeing Lark a bit out of her element, especially in this underground city. Here instead of Lark being the one looked up to, the leader, she is more of a student. Learning to control her powers. Discovering exactly what she is capable of. And then putting it all to the test.

The romance this time around was also a bit different. I loved, loved the romance of Skylark. Oren was absolutely amazing. So different than your typical romantic interest. In Shadowlark, the romance took a bit of a back seat to everything else that was going on. Don't worry there is still plenty of Oren, but not exactly like you might expect. In this installment, like Lark, Oren overcomes some of his personal obstacles in order to grow and make peace with himself. I missed not having Oren around so much, but by the ending, I was happy. Oren really came into his own in this installment. Gaining some much needed confidence and growing to accept what he is.

Final Verdict:

As far as sequels go, Shadowlark was well done. I loved the character growth. As well, as the introduction to a new city and its workings. The world-building wasn't as strong this time around, but it made sense for it not to, mostly due to this new city.

I am not exactly sure what to expect with the next (final?) installment. But I am hoping it will be more along the lines of what we got from Skylark.

Latest posts by Kate (see all)
Divider

One response to “Book Review: Shadowlark

  1. Sequels are tricky, because we have so many expectations for them. I am glad that you enjoyed this book, even if it wasn't for the reasons that you were expecting to enjoy it.

Leave a Reply

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.